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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 526 (some duplicates have been removed)
of international waters. 162 countries and the european community have ratified the treaty but the united states is not to read to the secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary leon panetta urged the senate to approve the treaty setting national security, job creation and oil exploration. they testified at the senate foreign relations committee. it's just under three hours. >> the hearing will come to order. thank you all very much for being with us today. secretary clinton, secretary panetta and general dempsey, welcome, we are privileged to have you here today. we thank you for joining us. it's a rare occasion in any committee but in this committee when we have simultaneously a panel of witnesses that brings together americans top diplomat, our country's top descends official and our nation's top military officer. your presence here altogether powerfully underscores the importance that you put on this issue. our committee shares the sense of importance which is why i hope without respect to party or ideology we begin an open, honest and comprehensive discussion about whether the
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now comcast your mind back -- cast your mind back to a decade ago, that question would seem absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would he need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we have become to the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke i heard probably about 5000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19 century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is taking up washington in a remote area and the soldier rides up and he declares old woman, from this day forth, this man -- this land is no longer politically his imperial russian. she watches him go. thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i will pass those laughs on to my fat
for arizona, but it does not work for the united states. observations that the population of arizona has simply gone to other states is accurate. so what arizona has tried to do while an effort at the state level to address the impact of illegal immigration is not a sound policy in the framework of what we need to do as a nation. those hyperbolic claims of racism reflects a racist construct of how our community works together and it's just as destructive as those who are motivated to demand a purge of all non-native born from the basis of a racist ideology and i for swain, enough. we need a sane approach. secure sovereign borders, account for those without lawful authority. engage in necessary bureaucratic reform and engage all levels of government for ongoing, internal enforcement and let me elab eate a little on that because i think that's what todd wanted to hear from me. secure our sovereign borders. our border must be operationally secure for several important reasons. number one, there isnis an inte security component. five years, peopleitarianed at the border from every country on
rate of undocumented population growth in the united states. simple equation in demography. net migration equals in migration minus out migration. you don't affect in migration, you dramatically reduce out migration, net migration increases. that's the sort of the rapid growth of undocumented migration into the united states. by militarizing the border with our closest trading partner, closest neighbor, with canada in the hemisphere, we didn't solve the problem of illegal migration. we made it worse. we transformed what had been a circular flow of male workers going to three states and turned it into a settled population of families living in 50 states, and double the net rate of undocumented population growth in the process. so now we have 11 million people living in this country out of status. and these people are a great loss, represent a great loss of human capital to the nation, because there is nowhere for them to go. they cannot use their skills to their utmost productivity. they cannot use their education. they are confined to a black market, informal sector in the unite
if you look at the successful record of immigrants to the united states, whether skilled or unskilled, documented or undocumented, across the last 200 years and particularly in the last 25 years and with the great renaissance of data that we now have at our disposal to analyze more clearly the impact of all types of immigration from 1990 forward, we realize that immigrants, again, skilled and unskilled, lawful and undocumented, bring to the effort of community building and business building and economy building something that is moderately intangible for now. if we work at it for a few more years it will be tangible and we will be able to quantify part of it. it's something that represents itself in generational achievement both for those immigrants who arrive, who form small businesses at a rate which is disproportionately higher than native-born citizens, for their children that in turn achieve at a level that is higher on average than the children of native-born citizens, not to disparage those who come from the united states or come from long lines of families that come from the u
interest in the united states and he said his message in washington was the united states is one budget deal away from being restored on the world stage. and i think -- and he was also saying that some countries in east asia were saying, look, don't spend your time with the united states. we're going to be the next power you know, so pay attention to us. and it's a challenge for the united states on how to deal with that. so frankly, you know, my feeling is that whether it's a question of the united states' ability to be a strong economy, to be innovative, to support foreign affairs budget, whether it's security issues, it has to start at home and i think that's a key issue of trying to restore the fundamentals of u.s. growth which include dealing with the spending and debt and deficit policies. not relying solely on monetary policy as we've largely been doing because if you rely on monetary policy for a long time, you plant the seeds of other problems. i don't only mean the fiscal issues. it's also what i find interesting now and what i experience with the world bank is that because i
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
in his speech in prague. the very first summit was held in the united states in 2010. two years later we gathered even more leaders together to focus on the seriousness of the risk of nuclear terrorism, the vulnerability of nuclear material around the world, the international cooperation it will take to secure that material, and prevent it ever coming into the hands of terrorists. >> so it is material as well as existing weaponry? >> and that is right. covers both sets of concerns. >> then you take it one level further. and know-how is involved. >> that is exactly right. >> in the united states, often we are more concerned nowadays -- is the correct phrase a suitcase bomb or something like that? >> improvised nuclear device. >> tell me the phrase again? >> improvised nuclear device. >> what does that mean, in my language? >> it's a pretty crude weapon, but it has probably a lot more material than our own warheads that we have built to go on the front end of missiles and travel reliably 3,000 miles. an improvised nuclear device would be bigger than a suitcase. the smaller you are, the mor
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
in the united states peaked. between 2008 and 2009 it actually fell from 12 million to 11 million people. since 2009, it's held steady at 11 -- probably trending downward. on a net basis, illegal mig sgrags now zero or negative. the border is in fact under control. the number of apprehensions -- 22,000 officers and they're having a harder time finding anybody to arrest. apprehensions at the mexico-u.s. border are now lower than at any time since 1972. have more and more officers chasing fewer and fewer people. part of this is the collapse in labor demand. particularly in residential home construction. after the great recession of 2008. but it's also been because the united states is quietly, without anybody really noticing, dramatically expanded temporary legal migration. given the choice, of course, migrants would much rather come here with legal documents. and in 2010, there were 517,000 -- 537,000 entries of mexicans into the united states with temporary work visas. the largest number of in history. so one of the reasons that illegal mig sgrags down is because opportunity have opened up in t
the united states and when i do, almost everywhere i go people, i'll ask them to raise hands. i do these informal polls. how many of you think that immigration is involved in national security and the hands go up. and rational people can argue how we're going to ration stuff. how many want flexible working conditions bi-nationally. hands go up. expand human rights, some hands go up. ours in a nation built on liberties, not on human rights but some of the things are similar. how many want a reduction in the noise along the border, all the hands go up. i will make one clarification and point here. i think, it's my experience that the border communities do suffer very significant financial cost and criminal justice law enforcement health care, education, et cetera. the nation as a whole benefits phenomenally from migration, but the cost and joys of migration are not evenly distributed. how many of you want to see a reduction in the political violence and the cartel stuff activities in mexico, all the hands go up, but we don't know quite how to deal with that and we are not willing to
the united states government was drafting the moral act and the homestead act of 1862 if they ever thought about the possibility of counter fit operations being established in the midwest and northern great plains.counterfit operati established in the midwest and northern great plains. and if so what were their plans in preventing such an event. >> i found no record of that being a concern it for tfor they department, which particularly in 1862 was, if you read samson chase's, the secretary treasury's diary, it becomes clear that he was running an endless effort simply to fund the next day's operations. or argue bring the past weably operations. day after day he comes in to his office to find million of dollars of unpaid bills on his desk and he'll complain about the fact that he has no idea how to pay them. and if they had been paid in cou counterfeit money, i think that would have been fine with him. most of the republican party was strongly opposed to the idea of fiat money, greenback money, to begin with. chase and lincoln were really driven to the wall by the fact that they had no alt
to say what is up there on the subhead -- debt is about a permanent part of the united states public policy in migration. -- death is now a permanent part of the united states public policy and migration. i have had the argument. we are not choosing that. you could tell that in 1998. maybe in 2000. but when you have the exact same results year after year after year and to spend no new resources to produce -- to reduce the number of migrant debts, it is now public policy. when you damn the organizations that are out there working to reduce the number of deaths, then you have said that is acceptable. debt is now a permanent part of the public policy -- death is now a permanent part of the public policy to deter migration. that, my friends, is immoral. it should not happen. let me just point out, there has been more than 2000 documented, measured, located death dots in arizona since november of 1999. some of those dots are on top of dtos. -- on top of dots. homeland security provided certain amount of information that about 70% of deaths in the last decade or so were found by other offi
, it covers economics. it covers the environment. and you know, if you just take the united states, you know, it's 4% of the world's population. you know, 20% or more of the world's economy. you got an interest in what's happening out there, whether it's from your own sense of ethics or whether it's your economic or security self-interest. so institutions like the world bank help address some of those problems and help not only improve the lives for people in those countries but thereby can come back and help europe and the united states japan, canada and others. >> obviously you're talking to a converted audience in terms of international audience with the desire to link ourselves together and create a common good both in the developed world and developing world. so i throw it open to a question. if you could raise your hand, identify yourself and don't be shy. i know it's always hard to get the first one out there. got one over here. looks likes an interaction staff person which was not a plant. >> no, not a plant. is this on? >> yeah. >> yes, thank you so much for your comments. i'm ken w
distrust and resentment of the united states can be traced to the mexican war. the mexican war also hastened the civil war. it might not have been fought if the mexican war had not opened the volatile slavery debate. now, the mexican war's often confused with the texan war for independence from mexico ten years earlier in 1836. the texas revolution is known for the battles of the alamo and san ha sin toe -- ha seen toe and the exploits of sam houston and davy crockett. the mexican war is known as polk's war. the 11th president, james k. polk, supervised it from its beginning in may 1846 to the treaty signing 21 months later. the peace treaty transferred 530,000 square miles from mexico to the united states, incredible territory. from mexico we obtained the future states of california, new mexico, arizona, nevada, utah and parts of colorado and wyoming. literally 42% of mexico's territory at that time. the major battles were fought at palo alto, monterey and buena vista, the gates of mexico city. always outnumbered, the americans won every major battle. sometimes, as in buena vista,
the state question is red or green, celebrating its 100th anniversary as a stake in the united states of america, protests all seven of our delegate votes for gary johnson, the next president of the united states. >> new york, home of the statue of liberty, cast the following boats, gary johnson 24, rice aid, carl pearson, one, and jim burns, one. >> the tar heels of the great state of north carolina respectfully cockboat -- respectfully vote hell no to amendment 1 and we vote rewrote -- 3 votes for lee rice and seven votes for gary johnson. >> mr. chairman, the state of oregon, whose government will not allow us to use it, cast one vote for karl pearson, 34 rice, an aide for gary johnson. >> the delegates from the commonwealth of pennsylvania, birthplace of the declaration of independence and the united states constitution and the state that rally kicked rick santorum's ass out of the senate casts two write-in votes for sam's loan, and enthusiastically cast nine votes for the next president of the united states, gary johnson. >> home of the independent man, rarely cast one vote for b
the years the united states and other democratic countries have imposed sanctions on the burmese government to pressure for change. now that there seems to be some progress at what pace should those sanctions be lifted? how does the u.s. provide rewards for progress without losing he have arerage for further change? >> i understand from a news broadcast this morning that senator mccain is thinking of the suspension of sanctions rather than lifting of sanctions. it possible first step. what has been done at the e.u., what has been done by the e.u., they would suspend sanctions but not lift them all together. that is a way sending a strong message that we will help the process of democratization. if this is not maintained we will have this think of other ways of making sure that the aspirations of people of burma for democracy is respected. i am am not against the suspension of sanctions as long as the people of the united states feel this is the right thing to do at the moment. i do, i do have a caution though. i sometimes feel that things, people are too optimistic about the scene in burma.
to be the same page as the united states, though, right? the united states would accept a little bit more, right? >> i don't think that's the united states' position. i think it's confined enrichment to 5%, limited to the medical isotopes. move anything above 5% out of the country or secure it, have full transparency and 24/7/365 day a year access for the iaea to all these sites. and then be willing to also talk about other things, which is what the iranians have wanted to do. i am hopeful. in my view it's the best chance of a solution. of course this is the p-5 plus one, so it's a unique bargaining agent, you might say. >> when you talk about access, i want to ask you about israel in a second, israel issue, but access. i have this picture which i know looks a little strange. the associated press obtained this from a government that is skeptical of iran's honesty in its nuclear program and they say this is a chamber used for testing explosives of nuclear weapons. we did make some calls and experts did say indeed this could be consistent with that but we haven't skbant independe identified the so
, and he said that the united states wanted to be a tremendous partner and cheerleader of the development of brazil's offshore industry. now, mr. president, i have to tell you that was like rubbing salt in the wound of tens of thousands of oil field workers and others who are suffering because of the obama administration policy here in this country really discouraging energy development. the way president obama proposed to be a strong supporter and partner and cheerleader of brazilian offshore development was through an ex-im bank loan and there are many of these sorts of loans. again, in august, 2009, talking about brazil, the case i mentioned, "the wall street journal" reported an editorial that -- quote -- "the u.s. is going to lend billions of dollars to brazil's state-owned oil company, petrobrass to finance exploration of the huge offshore delivery in brazil's oil field near rio de janeiro" -- close quote. again the ex-im bank provided a $2 billion loan to aid brazilian oil production and that's what president obama was cheering and encouraging and making happen. it's happened other
that's the reason i'm running for a second term as president of the united states of america. [cheers and applause] .. >> his working assumption is, if ceos and wealthy investors like camera get rich, and the rest of us automatically will, too. there was a woman in iowa who shared heard stories of the financial struggles, and he gave her an answer right out of an economic textbook. he said are part activity equals our income. [laughter] and the notion was that somehow the reason people can't pay their bills is because they are not working hard enough. if they got more productive, then suddenly their incomes would go up. well, those of us who spent time in the real world -- [laughter] know the problem isn't the american people are not productive enough. you've been working harder than ever. the challenge we face right now, and the challenge we faced for over a decade is that harder work has not led to higher income. and bigger profits at the top have that lead to better jobs. what governor romney doesn't seem to get is that a healthy economy doesn't just mean a few folks in ma
qaeda and foiled the plot to blow up a united states bound airliner. the mole got inside access to a key bomb cell in yemen and we are told he gained the terrorists trust and turned on them. the new and sophisticateed underwear bomb not hands of the united states agent. this appears to an big victory for united states intelligence because this are few known instances of u.s. supplies infiltrating a terrorist group. and the spy is reportedly safely out of yemen now, but sources tell fox there could be more bombs out there. the suspected mastermind is a yemen-based bombmaker who set his own brother on a suicide mission to kill a saudi prince. with a device implanted inside his body. it is also suspected of a failed 2010 cargo plant and a failed christmas day bombing a year earlier, and this was an upgrated version of the bomb, with no metal, a bomb that, right now, is said to be not hands of f.b.i. experts at a laboratory in virginia and trying to answer a key question. could this have gotten past airline security? catherine is on the story like in washington, dc this on, and a spy helped
award someday. the girl behind you could be a future president of the united states or even, better than that, the mayor of new york city. the guy sitting to your right could be a future nobel laureate. okay, maybe not the guy to your right but certainly the one to your left. >> memorial day weekend watch commencement speeches on c-span. politicians, white house officials and business leaders share their thoughts with the graduating class of 2012. >>> in a few moments, tuesday's pentagon briefing. in a half hour, a forum on how the media covers china. then a look at the national flood insurance program. and later, a small business administration discussion on the role of entrepreneurs. >>> several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. secretary of state hillary clinton, defense secretary leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey, testified before the senate foreign relations committee on the relationship between the law of the sea convention and national security. that's here on c-span3 at 10:00 eastern. at 10:30 a.m. eastern, on our co
's stake could make him worth $25 billion. the united states border patrol is unveiling a new national strategy. it makes no minutes of the bush administration's border fence. that is out. they are not coming over here now. the number coming from mexico and going to mexico is the same. why not break out the drones? drone them. the united states border patrol has the ability to deploy a drone anywhere in a matter of hours. and the prime suspect in the disappearance of the american teenager, natalee holloway may face trial in the united states. new details. [ donovan ] i hit a wall. and i thought "i can't do this, it's just too hard." then there was a moment. when i decided to find a way to keep going. go for olympic gold and go to college too. [ male announcer ] every day we help students earn their bachelor's or master's degree for tomorrow's careers. this is your moment. let nothing stand in your way. devry university, proud to support the education of our u.s. olympic team. ♪ wer surge, let it blow your mind. [ male announcer ] for fruits, veggies and natural green tea energy... ne
be bad for patients who rely on these medications and bad for the competitiveness of the united states. so i'm glad that this reauthorization, mr. president, clearly aways some of the conflict and the underbrush and will reauthorize and strengthen and streamline the review time line for new pharmaceuticals. not only will this provide the kind of predictability and certainty any business needs to succeed but it helps make sure the f.d.a.'s essential regulatory process keeps pace with scientific innovation. in my home state of delaware, there's more than 20,000 jobs that directly rely on biomedical research and innovation, but around the country, it's more than 4 million indirect and more than 675,000 jobs that directly benefit from this area. it's also, frankly, one of our strongest export areas of growth for the long term, so we need this reauthorization now. in my view, moving forward with this legislation also means finding the fine balance between speed and safety, between getting treatments to patients without delay and being certain these new drugs will be effective and safe. in a
canada to the united states, this must get permission from the president of the united states and there has to be an environmental impact statement to make sure it wouldn't have an adverse impact on the environment. everybody's in favor of that. republicans, democrats. no one want wants to hurt the environment. so in the great wisdom, i say very sarcastically of our government, the state department has sent it to transcanada, the environmental impact statement. they hire a company that they routinely do business that has every reason to curry favor and be light on the environmental impact statement so the proposal goes forward. it's sending the fox to guard the chicken coop. none of that was revealed second quarter when it came back, plane people were suspicious of it. to me, it's like, who is the -- who is the fool who thought that was a good idea to get an environmental impact statement from a company with a business relationship with the one who is want to build it? >> well, greta, you know, everyone wants energy to be as clean as it can be made, as fast as it can be made i
the effort? joining me now is james spidermarx. so, some u.s. lawmakers said the united states should take the lead and involve itself militarily. why is syria different than let's say libya. syria certainly had a greater population, a smaller piece of geography, therefore, it's a lot more urbanized and it becomes a very entangled and tough target to go against. unlike libya that had pocket of e resistance that were spread out and there seemed to be at some point, a unified opposition against gadhafi. so that answer to the question in terms of the difference between those two. in other words, it's a tougher nut to crack, a harder problem and would entangle us greatly. >> when you say something shouldn't be done, what is that something that should be done? >> well, clearly, what has to happen is the united, let's take it from the top and work our way down. united states is going to lose in this particular confrontation if russia brokers the deal to try to get assad to step aside. russia then is the peacemaker, russia owns the cards and have now caused this great con fill in syria to go away
. >>> the department of homeland security says 41 percent of illegal immigrants tried to reenter the united states after they had been deported. now u.s. customs and border patrol says it is cutting down that number to try something new. immigration rights advocates say it goes too far. casey ceiling reports from los angeles. >>> after a person is contracted to enter this country illegally they go through a fairly detailed process. their fingerprints, their identity is checked and then they are put into a data base. once officials determine they do not have a criminal background they are often taken into mexico where they started. kierding to u.s. customs and border protection roughly 41 percent of them are caught trying to come back to the united states at a later time. in tucson, arizona one of the busiest border patrol sectors some put immigrants on buses and transport them back to mexico by way of california and texas hundreds of miles away from their original point of entry. the concept is known adds lateral repatriation and the department of homeland security says it takes the recidivism rat
for the economy of the united states. i have been a supporter of the export-import bank since i arrived in congress in 1977. simply put, the ex-im bank supports the sales of american-made products overseas when private finances is not available. -- financing is not available. according to the ex-im bank's 2011 annual report, the bank supported $32.7 billion in exports last year, over 288,000 american jobs. many of these jobs are in the pacific northwest and in my congressional district. i ask unanimous consent to put -- and add additional information. the important point srk let's vote for this bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from california. mr. miller: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguish mad jort leader, the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor. the chair: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for one minute. mr. cantor: i thank the speaker and i thank the gentleman from california. mr. speaker, i rise today to speak in favor of h.r. 2072, securing american jobs through export act of 2011. make no mistake, i am no fan of government sub
between the united states and afghanistan. not an agreement between individuals. it's a national agreement. entered into because it was in interests of the united states and afghanistan. the first thing. the second thing is that it is obligations on both sides. which we would seek to being implemented. obligations on the u.s. side and on the afghan side. >> okay. stephen and then we'll let tom go. >> how concerned is the u.s. that the continuing budget cuts and austerity in europe could have nato to xct act in the fut in a situation like libya? and growth in europe. do you expect any actions that could impact the economy, the european economy in a short term and obviously an effect on the u.s. economy? >> actions in what context? >> actions on growth rather than simply talking about how growth is an important factor. >> okay. with respect to nato and the way forward, one of the sessions indeed the first alliance session will be devoted to nato capabilities. and they have, the nato allies have undertaken a study over the last two years focused on those capabilities that if believes are esse
legalizing drugs would have a very positive effect on the murder rate in the united states. guest: i believe that. if we look at border violence with mexico, 40,000 deaths south of the border over the last four years. this is a prohibition phenomenon. these are disputes being played out with guns rather than the courts. legalized marijuana, arguably 75% of the border violence goes away as a result of legalizing marijuana. that being the estimate of the drug cartel's activities involved in the marijuana trade. host: the next call comes from michigan, outside detroit. jamie, you are on. caller: i was calling because i have a problem with the child protective services right now. i am wondering why in michigan the target of lower income families. they are targeting the lower income families and there is not any fairness in the court system. guest: i do not have the answer in this particular -- if the state is utilizing discretion in how the funds are being distributed. i get back to the model i think we're going to have to have to fix medicaid and medicare. virtually all existing federal program
, that's false and ludicrous. now, my view on immigration in the united states and illegal immigration is formed from several different areas of experience. first had to do with my role as a staff officer for the third armored cavalry regiment, and providing active duty soldiers to assist with joint operations on a reservation which straddles arizona and mexico to help interdict the smuggling of drugs. it's also informed by my role as a life prosecutor prosecuting albany duis in maricopa county with the passage of an amendment to specifically deny bail to those in the country without lawful authority who committed serious offenses. anytime that i have someone who is a mexican national or even from canada, the accused of a felony dui, they would be admitted to bail in which they would feel to show for subsequent prosecution. then in supervising prosecutions are maricopa county, i dealt first in what circumstances in which drug cartels in mexico would order cars from street gangs in phoenix. which would then be picked up by someone who crossed the border, ostensibly as a one day tourist,
going to be millions and millions of pieces of paper circulating across the united states into every wallet, symbols of prosperity and the future of the country and there ought to be a picture on there. so every denomination, every greenback printed during the civil war had chase's picture on it until he left as treasury secretary. so any other questions? >> one quick question. i'm very encouraged by the 37th congress' accomplishments, but i'm also troubled by the prescription for their success and i was curious if there was anything that we could do other than asking our good friends from south of the mason dixon to kind of leave the session, which governor perry has indicated some desire to do, if there's any other success for relieving gridlock today. >> yes, that's an excellent question. hopefully we will not have such an extreme solution, but i think in the second of my points where i it talked about a compelling agenda this is where i tend to see a way forward. i would argue that part of the fact that we are at such a 50/50 in our country right now, election after election bein
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 526 (some duplicates have been removed)